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Is the BJP dangerous? Show more Show less
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Founded in 1950, modern India is a federal parliamentary democratic republic, with 28 states and 8 union territories. At the 2019 election, almost 614 million people voted, a record 67.1% voter turn out. The Bharativa Janata Party (BJP) was re-elected with a single-party majority, the first since 1971 to do so. With its alliance partners in the National Democratic Alliance, it won 353 of the 543 seats in the lower house or Lok Sabha. Since then many have speculated that the BJP is creating a dangerous political and social environment.

No, the Bharativa Janata Party (BJP) is not dangerous Show more Show less

The BJP has been demonised by the international media. This is unjust as it has done many positive things as well as not being an outlier internationally.
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The BJP simply exposes existing tensions

The BJP is not dangerous – it is simply revealing the bubbling communal, caste and regional tensions that have always existed.
BJP Caste System India Nationalism Religion
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The Argument

Indian society is divided by religion, region, language, caste and ethnicity. Communal, caste and regional tensions continue to haunt Indian politics, threatening its long-standing democratic and secular ethos.[1] Although the BJP government stoked the fires of unrest during its first term, these societal divisions already existed.[2][3] India has a long history of politically instigated sectarian riots that existed long before the BJP came to power. Most notably, under the Congress party, at least 2,733 Sikhs were killed in the streets of Delhi after the 1984 assassination of Indira Gandhi by her Sikh bodyguards.[4] The BJP did not create this undercurrent, but revealed them: beneath the surface of what the elite had believed was a liberal syncretic culture, India was indeed a cauldron of religious nationalism, anti-Muslim sentiment and deep-seated caste bigotry.[4] Communal, caste and regional tensions continue to haunt Indian politics, threatening its long-standing democratic and secular ethos.[1]

Counter arguments

Premises

[P1] Indian society is split by many long-term divisions. [P2] The BJP is bringing these to the foreground, not creating them.

Rejecting the premises

Further Reading

Narendra Modi is taking India down a dangerous path. Financial Times Editorial Feb 29 2020, https://www.ft.com/content/e0dff26e-5a38-11ea-a528-dd0f971febbc

References

  1. http://www.rogerdarlington.me.uk/Indianpoliticalsystem.html
  2. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/world/asia/modi-india-elections.html
  3. https://carnegieendowment.org/2018/10/11/what-is-secret-to-success-of-india-s-bharatiya-janata-party-bjp-pub-77477
  4. https://time.com/5586415/india-election-narendra-modi-2019/
This page was last edited on Monday, 26 Oct 2020 at 14:38 UTC

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