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Should the UK have remained in the EU? Show more Show less
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Now that Brexit has happened, the UK has officially left the European Union. As the transition period continues and the effects of the decision to leave the EU begin to be felt, we will begin to be able to evaluate whether it was the right choice. Is the UK really stronger upon leaving the EU? Or would it have been better off to remain united?

No, the UK should have left the EU Show more Show less

For numerous reasons, it was the right position that British citizens voted to leave the European Union.
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The UK should have left the EU for economic reasons

The Pound is a stronger and more valuable form of currency than the Euro. The UK was justified in leaving the EU because it strengthened its legal tender and allowed the UK to negotiate its own trade deals. These trade deals do not need to meet EU standards and may be more beneficial to the UK.

Context

Citizens of the United Kingdom narrowly voted to leave the European Union in 2016. Central arguments for leaving included the theory that the UK's economy would benefit because of freedom from the EU's trade agreements and currency.

The Argument

The EU trade rules hamper the UK’s ability to grow its economy. Currently, the UK operates under the European Union’s trade rules – these include worker’s rights, environmental policies, and competition.[1] With the United Kingdom exiting the EU, it can move away from these restrictive rules and negotiate trades deals on its own terms. One big sticking point for this regards fishing in British waters. The UK stated that new economic agreements on fisheries must understand that fishing in the United Kingdom’s waters is for British anglers first and foremost.[2] British sovereignty from the European Union boosts its ability to create a more robust economy where the British Pound flourishes. The UK negotiates strong trade agreements – ultimately creating a more robust economy.[3]

Counter arguments

There is no guarantee that the European Union and the United Kingdom will come to a trade agreement. If that does not happen, the UK would have to trade with the EU under the trade rules set by the World Trade Organization.[4] This arrangement means that most British goods sent to EU countries would have tariffs placed on them, making them more expensive and more challenging to sell in Europe. Many fear that a “no-deal Brexit” hurts the British economy by raising costs on goods and the potential loss of jobs.[5]

Proponents

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-47213842
  2. https://www.bbc.com/news/46401558
  3. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-54062413
  4. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-47213842
  5. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47470864
This page was last edited on Wednesday, 30 Sep 2020 at 00:08 UTC

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