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Do cell phones cause cancer? Show more Show less
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The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified the radiofrequency fields generated by cell phones as "possibly carcinogenic to humans." With billions of people around the world using cell phones on a regular basis, any link between cell phones and cancer would represent a major public health risk. What does the science say? Has enough research been done? And can existing studies be trusted?

Yes, cell phones increase the risk of cancer. Show more Show less

There is enough evidence to conclude cell phones are linked to cancer.
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Cancer incidence correlates with cell phone use

The number of cancer cases went up dramatically in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, just as cell phones were becoming widespread.
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The Argument

There is a correlation between the rising number of cancer cases and the rapid spread of cell phone use. Cell phones first began to become widely available to consumers in the 1990s, growing to over 5 billion cell users by the late 2010s. Over roughly the same time period, from 1990 to 2017, the number of cancer deaths globally increased by 66%. These trends are exactly what would be expected if cell phone use was causing increased cancer risk.

Counter arguments

Correlation does not mean causation. There is no concrete proof that increased cancer rates are caused by radiation emitted by cell phones.

Premises

[P1] As cell phone use has risen, so have cancer rates. [P2] Cell phones must be causing the increase in cancer rates.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P2] There's no real proof that cell phone use is responsible for cancer rates.

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This page was last edited on Friday, 7 Feb 2020 at 17:13 UTC

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