argument top image

< Back to question Will the Black Lives matter movement create lasting change? Show more Show less

There’s no question that the wave of protests against police violence and racial injustice across the country has had a tremendous impact. “It’s different this time” has been a frequent sentiment among historians, activists and other experts. Is it too early to tell?

No, the #BLM Protests will not create lasting change Show more Show less

Like so many movements before this one, the social injustice and systemic racism will remain long after the protests have died down.
< (2 of 2)

Democrats haven’t shown the ambition needed to tackle the scale of the problem

“Already Democrats are at odds with activists and even popular opinion over how to address police brutality.” — Alexander Sammon, American Prospect
< (4 of 4)

The Argument

It will be hard for the Black Lives Matter to create lasting change because U.S Democrats have not shown the ambition or initiative to tackle the problem. In the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests going on nationwide, the term "performative allyship" has been thrown around quite a bit. Many Democratic politicians have fallen into the performative ally category.[1] They have voiced their support for the movement but have not supported the concrete proposals and policies that the movement advocates for. While BLM is making demands to defund the police, ban chokeholds, and end no-knock warrants, Democratic lawmakers instead turn to symbolic gestures like wearing kente cloth while kneeling on the floor of the U.S Capitol and ordering that the words "Black Lives Matter" be painted on city streets.[1] These gestures will not bring the change needed to address systemic racism. Democrats have not shown the initiative to embrace policies that would address racial injustice in America. Black Lives Matter movement leaders have recommended various policies to tackle racial injustice, but Democrats have not adopted these policies into their 2020 platform.[2] Many agree that Joe Biden, rather than Donald Trump, is the right presidential candidate to tackle systemic racism and criminal justice reform. But there is skepticism surrounding whether the Democratic nominee will actually create and implement policies that effectively address the issues at hand.[3] Many Democrats have not shown the initiative when it comes to championing and pushing for policies that will actually tackle and bring change to systemic racism in America.

Counter arguments

While some Democratic politicians have neither supported nor created policies that will help tackle police brutality and racial injustice, this case is not true for all of them. In the wake of the national protests following the death of Geroge Floyd, House and Senate Democrats brought forth the Justice in Policing Act of 2020. The bill includes a wide range of reforms to police departments including creating a national registry to track police misconduct, prohibiting chokeholds, etc.[4] Democrats themselves have shown and spoken on the need to aggressively tackle the problem. For example, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated that America "can't settle for anything other than transformative structural change".[4] National protests have brought a renewed energy to Democrats to bring about real, lasting, and effective change to America in regards to systemic racism, police brutality, and racial injustice.

Premises

Rejecting the premises

Proponents


References

  1. https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/shannonkeating/democrats-kente-cloth-pelosi-cuomo-bowser-black-lives-matter
  2. https://www.axios.com/blm-democrats-party-platform-f57dd086-15d4-4f9d-aa50-bbfb4f5003eb.html
  3. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2020/07/08/joe-biden-young-black-voters-say-not-excited-candidate/5344135002/
  4. https://www.npr.org/2020/06/08/871625856/in-wake-of-protests-democrats-to-unveil-police-reform-legislation

This page was last edited on Sunday, 20 Sep 2020 at 01:47 UTC

Vote

Not sure yet? Read more before voting ↑

Explore related arguments