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Does the West still value human rights in light of its dismissal of Khashoggi's death? Show more Show less

The West used to be the loudest voice advocating for human rights. But Western governments' evasive stances on the horrifying death of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi government dissident, suggest this is no longer the case. In the light of huge economic links and political turbulence, are human rights still valued in western civilization?

Hard to say, because promoting human rights globally is complicated Show more Show less

There lies an array of predicaments.
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Denial of human rights obligations is difficult to punish

The effectiveness of measures, such as sanctions, and under what conditions, is debatable.
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Context

The Argument

Implementing effective measures to fight back human rights violations are difficult. Firstly, The universal declaration on global human rights is not a treaty in formal sense yet. Although it was approved by the general assembly, the UN charter did not give the general assembly the power to make international law, not to mention that violators are not committed to join such treaties or institutions. Consequently, negligence of international obligations is controversial to punish. Moreover, even if a binding documents are ratified, some states often use reservations, understandings, and declarations (RUDs) to avoid obligations. Take Saudi Arabia for an example, The country's RUD states that convention is not applicable when it conflicts with sharia law.

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    This page was last edited on Thursday, 24 Jan 2019 at 12:18 UTC