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< Back to question Why are there so many coronavirus cases in the US? Show more Show less

The US now has more COVID-19 cases than any other country in the world. But why? The virus has taken hold at an alarming speed, outpacing other nations and leading to questions over its healthcare system, economy, capacity for state intervention and policy priorities. Is its spread symptomatic of other weaknesses?

Weak existing infrastructure Show more Show less

US infrastructure is too weak to support a pandemic.
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An exclusive healthcare system

The US healthcare system naturally excludes most Americans. Negotiating this situation during a pandemic confused policymakers.
coronavirus health infrastructure politics
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Context

The American healthcare system is famously exclusionary. Currently, more than 18 million Americans are without health insurance. Of those that do have insurance, 29% are categorised as 'underinsured'. It is therefore woefully underprepared for the arrival of a global health pandemic.

The Argument

The barriers posed by the healthcare system are manifold. And raise questions - should those that are unable to afford basic healthcare be treated? Should only the wealthy have access to a vaccine or coronavirus treatment? Since the virus arrived in the US, over 800 experts have written to US policymakers demanding action for the uninsured. Yet, these please have fallen on deaf ears. Federal governments have refused to commit to any agreement that would give these people treatment or access to healthcare, if they were struck by Covid-19. Unsurprisingly, without these measures passed, hospitals are now openly stating they will have to give priority to the insured. Soumi Saha, a Senior Director overseeing 4,000 hospitals explained this when she said "The truth is no one truly knows how much this will cost," and went on to explain their budgets were already overstretched. In this case, is it any wonder the virus is spreading as it is?

Counter arguments

Premises

Rejecting the premises


References


    This page was last edited on Tuesday, 30 Jun 2020 at 11:07 UTC