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Do video games cause violence? Show more Show less
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For decades, parents, psychologists, and neuroscientists have studied the potential connection between violent video games and the level of real-world violence displayed by the children and young adults who play them, especially those shown on the national stage for criminal activity and mass shootings. A plethora of research and academic study has erupted from this debate, contributing to our growing knowledge of how the brain works when interacting with video games and why further research into the topic is important. So, as we traverse a new world of technological advancement and even more complex immersion into video games, do video games cause violence?

Yes, video games do cause violence Show more Show less

With gore and violence in the most popular video game titles today, children are increasingly exposed to dangerous material.
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Gaming can have devastating pathological side-effects.

Internet gaming disorder is proof of a correlation between violence and gaming.
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The Argument

Concerned parents and many psychologists studying neurological behavior in young adults believe there is a connection between violent video games and real-world violence. This lobby calls for greater insight into what can make gaming potentially dangerous. Video games have absolutely dominated much of adolescent and young adult culture for years. Scientific studies regarding the effects that video games have had on the brain are discouraging, even frightening. Internet gaming disorder has recently been added as an official addictive mental illness by psychologists, which suggests a darker underside to the otherwise fun pastime for many across the world. A study at BYU about family life discovered that, while 90% of gamers show very low signs of video game addiction, 10% display the symptoms commonly associated with Internet gaming disorder. When comparing the "pathological" gamers to the "non-pathological" ones, researchers found that the "pathological" ones showed higher levels of "depression, aggression, shyness, problematic cell phone use and anxiety by emerging adulthood."[1] Though data is still inconclusive about the correlation between mass shooters and violent video games, a link can still be seen among those who are pathologically addicted. If "aggression" is a side effect, then violence could certainly be the next step.

Counter arguments

Simply because symptoms like depression and aggression are prevalent because of severe addiction does not equate to the "next step" of violence or even mass shootings. A minor link between the two still does not account for a lack of evidence showing any correlation between violence and violent video games. The conclusion that real-world violence can emerge from simple, arbitrary "aggression" in those who are addicted is entirely illogical.

Framing

Internet gaming disorder induces many problematic symptoms for those under its grip. If research has shown aggression to be a primary side effect to a severe case of the disorder, violence could be another step in the process.

Premises

[P1] Research-based psychological conclusions could provide evidence for a broader claim or correlation between the topics being researched. [P2] Internet gaming disorder has proven to cause aggression in severe cases, which could easily lead to violence. [P3] Therefore, video games cause violence.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P2] "Aggression" is an arbitrary term, and to claim that violence and mass shootings can emerge from that definition in addicted gamers is unfounded. [Rejecting P3] Theorizing a correlation based off of the previous premises is illogical.

References

  1. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/05/200513143803.htm
This page was last edited on Tuesday, 26 May 2020 at 08:59 UTC