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< Back to question What are the forms of European anti-Semitism? Show more Show less

Anti-Semitism is prejudice or hatred against Jews. Those feelings are tied to a number of different issues and express themselves in different ways. Unfortunately, these views still exist in places around the world.

Identitarian Anti-Semitism Show more Show less

Identitarian anti-Semitism believes Jews do not fit in with mainstream European culture.
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Jews are dirty, weak, poor, uncivilised


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Context

Identarian antisemitism has its origins in many different stereotypes. Early modern British literature played on Jewish stereotypes through imperialism, Social Darwinism, socialism, proto-Zionism, and mainstream depictions of sexuality. Identarian antisemitism is a link between modern antisemitism and traditional Christian views of the Jewish people.

The Argument

The two most important tenements of identarian antisemitism are its deep roots in the historical and the political. Jewish stereotyping, in the sense that qualities that many perceive to be true about the Jewish people make them unfit for mainstream society, comes from historical contexts and political beliefs. Jewish stereotyping in the mainstream society is based within the historical contexts of antisemitism as opposed to mythical representations. Jewish stereotyping within the realm of literature has little to do with actual literary interpretations but the political implications of the time. Much of identarian antisemitism steams changes within a society. For example, antisemitism in 19th century England was largely due to the changing ideas about what Victorianism meant to England. One of those changing ideas had to do with immigration, especially considering a mass Jewish immigration into England during the 1870’s. It was this concern that ultimately ended the concept of a refugee’s right for asylum in England. The Great Depression of 1873 and growing British imperialism also factored into these changing ideals within Victorian England, specifically the idea of promoting a more homogenous society.

Counter arguments

Premises

Rejecting the premises


References


    This page was last edited on Friday, 10 Jul 2020 at 16:24 UTC