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Do video games cause violence? Show more Show less

For decades, parents, psychologists, and neuroscientists have studied the potential connection between violent video games and the level of real-world violence displayed by the children and young adults who play them, especially those shown on the national stage for criminal activity and mass shootings. A plethora of research and academic study has erupted from this debate, contributing to our growing knowledge of how the brain works when interacting with video games and why further research into the topic is important. So, as we traverse a new world of technological advancement and even more complex immersion into video games, do video games cause violence?

No, video games do not cause violence Show more Show less

There is no proven correlation between playing violent games and real-world violence.
< Previous (3 of 3 Positions)

There are known cognitive benefits to frequent video game use

Some claim playing video games is directly responsible for violence and severe mental disturbance. Yet research contradicts this.
< Previous (2 of 2 Arguments)

Context

The Argument

Neurologists and scientific researcher doubt the harmful effects of video games.Many scientific studies on video games' impact on the shape and neural patterns of the brain focus on violence. These studies show there is no evidence for a link between violent video games and gamer violence, but that video games can actually improve spatial reasoning and prolonged attention or concentration. According to MedicalNewsToday, "For video game use by children, most parents – 71 percent – indicate that video games have a positive influence on their child’s life[...]The top three best-selling video games of 2016 were Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, Battlefield 1, and Grand Theft Auto V. "[1]Also citing improved memory for older brain-boosting mobile games, these scientific studies shed new light on how beneficial, instead of destructive, video games can be to a player's neural networks. Rather than finding a link between violence and violent video games, scientists have found something incredibly promising.

Counter arguments

Video games have a proven negative impact on the brain. Chief amongst these is a common addictive problem called "internet gaming disorder."[1][2]A lack of evidence for violence does not necessarily equate to complete incongruity. As its addictive side-effects show, gaming can have long-lasting negative effects on a person.

Framing

When research not only entirely refutes a supposedly sound claim, but makes another claim based off of newfound data pointing in the opposite direction, the original claim is a proven falsity. The benefits of video games use outshine the glaring lack of evidence among the scientific community for real-world gamer violence.

Premises

[P1] Scientific studies disproving a claim because of a lack of evidence while simultaneously displaying data in the opposite direction completely refute the previous claim. [P2] Neuroscientific studies show no correlation between violent video games and violence in gamers while positing that video games improve spatial reasoning, concentration, and memory. [P3] Therefore, video games do not cause violence.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] A lack of evidence does not always necessarily lead to a complete refutation of a correlation, and failing to state both the positive AND negative attributes of the topic in question is disingenuous. [Rejecting P2] Gaming has pros and cons, one of the most essential cons being a diagnosable mental disorder regarding video game addiction. Violence cannot be immediately disregarded because of gaming's cognitive benefits. [Rejecting P3] The claim that video games do not cause violence is illogical based off of the previous premises.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318345#Video-games-and-brain-changes
  2. https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/internet-gaming

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This page was last edited on Tuesday, 26 May 2020 at 08:56 UTC