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< Back to question Which books should you read while self-isolating from coronavirus? Show more Show less

Books can be life-changing. They can be a form of escapism that give a unique perspective into lives, times, places and ideas we will never experience ourselves. Or, a way of learning new ways of thinking, being and approaching the world. With all this time now spare, what are the key texts we should be reading?

Self-help Show more Show less

Alone? Self-acceptance has never felt more important.
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"Lifespan: Why We Age – And Why We Don’t Have To" by David A. Sinclair and Matthew D. LaPlante

Harvard researcher David Sinclair explores reverse aging. If we investigate the untapped powers of our own vitality genes, we’ll likely find both the answer and a more fulfilling life.
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The Argument

You should read Lifespan: Why We Age – And Why We Don’t Have To while self-isolating from the coronavirus because the author discusses ways in which people can improve their longevity. [1] The book discusses habits that people can try to improve their lifestyle. Self-isolation is a vital time in which people can create good habits. Habits can take up to 66 days to form, which makes self-isolation the ideal time for people to create beneficial habits. [2] This book is also beneficial in comparison to current events. During a time of self-isolation for a virus that does not have a cure yet, it can be encouraging to read about the longevity of human life. It provides hope for the reader’s life in a time of self-isolation. By explaining potential ways to improve one’s lifestyle, the book puts the reader in control of their health while self-isolating. Lifespan is a good book to read while self-isolating because it educates the reader on scientific breakthroughs about aging. It gives access to readers that are not scientific experts on longevity and genetics. It helps people to learn more about genetics and the possibilities of reversing the aging process. [3] This allows people to see the potential future of humankind and change the reader’s perspective towards aging.

Counter arguments

This argument is made under the assumption that people want to change their habits while self-isolating. Some people may desire to use self-isolation as a time to relax and practice self-care. People could be already satisfied with their habits and deem themselves healthy, so they won't want to change anything. While self-isolating, people want an escape rather than another change in their lives. With so much changing in society due to the pandemic, people would rather get lost in fiction. They would find it much more comforting to distract themselves instead of reading more science-related books.

Premises

[P1] Social isolation has caused people to alter their day to day habits. [P2] Lifespan: Why We Age – And Why We Don’t Have To explains the science for longevity and advice on how to improve one’s health through certain habits. [P3] People can build new, healthier habits while self-isolating from coronavirus. [P4] People should read Lifespan: Why We Age – And Why We Don’t Have To to build habits supporting a longer life.

Rejecting the premises


References

  1. https://www.outsideonline.com/2404642/lifespan-david-sinclair-book-review
  2. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2020/04/20/use-social-isolation-as-a-time-to-create-good-habits/#7ba6a7494556
  3. https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781501191978?aff=NPR

This page was last edited on Tuesday, 1 Sep 2020 at 14:18 UTC

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