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Is social media being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states? Show more Show less
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The 2016 US Presidential election saw the use of fake news to concentrate polarising content in swing states, and to intimidate certain groups of people into not showing up to vote. Under the extreme pressure of the 2020 Presidential elections, is social media being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states?

No, social media is not being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states Show more Show less

Social media is not being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states. The use of fake news in politics is overstated and voter suppression is a myth.
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The majority of Americans were not exposed to fake news during the 2016 election

Social media is not being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states. The use of fake news in politics is overstated and the majority of Americans were not actually exposed to disinformation during the 2016 presidential election.

The Argument

A study of more than 16,000 Twitter users found that only a small fraction of fake news spread during the 2016 presidential election.[1] Only a small number saw the majority of misinformation, and those that saw it were typically older and politically conservative. Therefore the effect of fake news, and in particular its effect on swing states may have been less pervasive on social media during the election than originally thought.

Counter arguments

Even a small amount of fake news could have an impact on the political process and therefore on the US presidential election.

Proponents

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/01/majority-americans-were-not-exposed-fake-news-2016-us-election-twitter-study-suggests
This page was last edited on Saturday, 24 Oct 2020 at 16:51 UTC

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