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< Back to question What are the solutions to the Israel Palestine conflict? Show more Show less

What started as intercommunal violence between Israelis and Arabs in the 1920s evolved over the course of the twentieth century into a full-blown civil war and open conflict. After much bloodshed and the dawn of a new century, what would a solution to the Israel-Palestine situation look like? Is peace even a possibility for one of the world's longest-running conflicts?

A two-state solution to the Israel Palestine Conflict Show more Show less

There must be two separate, independent states, one Israeli and one Palestinian, each with its own government and full autonomy over its domestic and international affairs.
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Right of return in Israel Palestine

A two-state solution would solve the issue of Palestinian refugees who wish to return to their homeland.
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Proponents


Context

Palestinian refugees are scattered throughout the Middle East and the world, and have been forced out of their homeland for decades. These refugees should be permitted to return to their country of origin. The establishment of a Palestinian state under a two-state solution would allow these refugees to return.

The Argument

Under a two-state solution, a Palestinian state would be established. This would allow the millions of Palestinian refugees living in places like Jordan and the US to return to their homeland.[1] This would be impossible under a one-state solution. The reason Israel desires control of the area is to have a specifically Jewish state, and if they were to share this area with Palestinians it would undermine the Zionist philosophy. This is why Palestinians have been pushed out of their land historically by the Israeli government; so the Israel-occupied area will be solely Jewish. Under a one-state solution, the Israeli government would not allow Palestinians to return to their homeland, and the refugees across the globe deserve the basic human right of return to their homeland. A two-state solution presents an equal solution while granting Palestinians the right to return to their homeland.

Counter arguments

If the agreement was brokered by outside nations, a one-state solution under which Israel was forced to accept Palestinian refugees back could work and not violate the Palestinian right of return. The assumed problem this argument has with a one state solution is that Israel would not allow Palestinian refugees back to their homeland. However, this problem could be easily avoided. If an outside force such as the UN, US, or other nations were to ensure that the treaty was upheld, rights could be given to Palestinian refugees during the establishment of a single state. Israel could not break this rule without facing international backlash. A two state solution has been tried in the past and has failed; a one state solution could be done in a way that ensures Israel does not violate Palestinian right of return.

Framing

Believers of this argument think that it is a basic human right to be able to reside in one's homeland and that refugees morally deserve the right of return to Palestine.

Premises

[P1] Palestinian refugees could only return under a Palestinian state. [P2] Only a two-state solution allows for the creation of a Palestinian state. [P3] Therefore, only a two-state solution can grant Palestinian refugees the right to return.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] A creative solution could allow for Palestinians to return under a single state.

References

  1. https://www.afsc.org/resource/palestinian-refugees-and-right-return

This page was last edited on Thursday, 17 Sep 2020 at 07:26 UTC

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