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Who should pay for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's security? Show more Show less
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On March 31 2020, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle officially ceased to be senior members of the royal family. Their decision to step down from royal duties comes at a price. Their high security detail is alleged to have cost the UK taxpayer upwards of $9 million. No longer entitled to any public protection, and now based in Los Angeles, some argue the couple must foot the bill themselves. Others call this irresponsible, and say the state - wherever they live - should pay.

The state should pay Show more Show less

The state has a responsibility to protect its citizens.
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As they are at risk of attack, the state should pay

Harry and Meghan are at risk of being kidnapped or attacked due to their 'high value' celebrity status. Therefore, the state should pay for their protection.

Context

As Prince Harry and Meghan Markle reside in Los Angeles today, having exited from the royal family in January, there has been heavy debate surrounding the issue of their security costs. At the moment, the married couple employs a personal security team, but their high-profile status puts them largely at risk of attack in any country. The British state should consider their well-being and provide them with ample security.

The Argument

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle left the royal family and English nation months ago, but their security remains a significant concern anywhere they go. The British state would do well to recognize this universal danger their high-profile status raises and provide the married couple a sufficient security detail. Security experts have noted that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at the taxpayers’ expense against the “threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come.” [1] The threat of royal family fanatics and terror groups against Meghan and Harry remains dangerous no matter the location they reside in. The British state should provide these two with an adequate security detail that will protect them against such perilous threats. In Los Angeles specifically, there are aggressive paparazzi techniques that Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are both subjected to on a daily basis and need protection from. Back when Prince Harry and Meghan relocated to Canada, a Commonwealth country, from the U.K., their security was still paid for by the state. [2] Since then, though, their security has become a private matter. The threats Harry and Meghan face in any nation put them at high risk of attack or harassment. The British state should recognize such danger and publicly fund their security. There are even fears among some security experts that the palace and government officials may be “underestimating” the potential threat against the couple. [1] As security remains a necessity for Harry and Meghan’s complete safety, the state should provide them a security detail to ensure their well-being.

Counter arguments

The vast majority of British taxpayers do not want to foot Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's security bills. Seeing as to how the couple made a historic 'Megxit' from the royal family in early 2020, it should not have to fall on the general British public to supply the couple with a security detail. If Harry and Meghan are not even in the U.K., nor carrying out any royal duties, the British state should not be obligated to supply them with any security. There would be too high a monetary cost to the British people, as well as a great uproar if the state should reverse course and supply Harry and Meghan with security again. The British public should not fund a security detail for the couple because the couple has arguably nothing to do with the U.K. anymore.

Proponents

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/royal-family/2020/01/18/meghan-harry-will-need-taxpayer-funded-security-years-come/
  2. https://observer.com/2020/06/prince-harry-meghan-markle-hire-new-private-security-firm-los-angeles/

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This page was last edited on Friday, 10 Jul 2020 at 16:24 UTC

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