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Is sleeping during the night important for health? Show more Show less
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Some people prefer to work at night, and they call themselves night owls. Early birds are the people sleep at night and wake up early. Many CEOs and business tycoons propagate the virtues of sleeping at night and waking up early. On the other hand, there are top creatives who prefer working at night. But which one of these promotes healthy habits and good mental and physical health?

One need not sleep at night to be healthy Show more Show less

The time of day in which people sleep does not affect their health.
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Sleeping times do not affect a person's health

Contrary to popular belief, it does not matter when a person sleeps
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The Argument

People aged 18 to 64 are advised to sleep for 7 to 9 hours each day,[1] but it does not matter when we fall asleep. Our bodies engage in several activities while we sleep, from repairing cells to fighting infection and inflammation. [2] To ensure that our bodies heal as we sleep, it is more important to sleep for the recommended number of hours per day than to sleep during the night. The time of day will not have an impact on our health as long as we have good quality sleep. Although countless people might argue that not sleeping at night can increase a person's chance of falling sick and eventually getting a terminal disease such as cancer, a recent study by Oxford University showed that there is no connection between getting breast cancer and working at night. [3] Additionally, millions of people who work late night shifts have not gotten any terminal diseases, which supports the argument that one's bedtime does not influence overall health.

Counter arguments

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need
  2. https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/news/7-amazing-things-that-happen-to-your-body-while-you-sleep#:~:text=Studies%20have%20shown%20that%20when,increased%20risk%20of%20heart%20disease%20.
  3. https://www.millionwomenstudy.org/introduction/
This page was last edited on Friday, 14 Aug 2020 at 08:50 UTC