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What are the solutions to the Israel Palestine conflict? Show more Show less

What started as intercommunal violence between Israelis and Arabs in the 1920s evolved over the course of the twentieth century into a full-blown civil war and open conflict. After much bloodshed and the dawn of a new century, what would a solution to the Israel-Palestine situation look like? Is peace even a possibility for one of the world's longest-running conflicts?

There is no solution to the Israel Palestine conflict Show more Show less

The political objectives of both sides, coupled with the current political climate, mean that no solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict is available.
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No trust

Without trust, neither side can negotiate for a lasting solution to the conflict.
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Context

In order for there to be a solution, both sides need to come to the negotiating table secure in the knowledge that the other party will abide by any agreement signed. Neither side trusts the other to stick to an agreement. Therefore, there cannot be lasting peace.

The Argument

The threat of violence through groups like Hamas makes a lasting peace impossible. Israelis are not willing to make concessions to a population that could compromise the safety of Israeli citizens at any moment. Without concessions, there will be no agreement. Without an agreement, there will be no peace. [1] On the other side, Palestinians do not trust Israelis not to deprive Palestinians of rights (under a one-state solution) or territory (under a two-state). Until both sides can trust the other to negotiate in good faith, a solution will remain elusive. [2]

Counter arguments

Other international governments can broker peace. Even if neither side trusts the other to implement a solution, they might trust an international government to use its diplomatic or financial leverage to pressure the other side into upholding an agreement. Therefore, the inclusion of governments like the US, Egypt, Jordan or Saudi Arabia in the peace negotiations could bring about a solution to the conflict. [1]

Framing

Premises

[P1] To negotiate a solution, both sides need to trust the other to implement a deal. [P2] Currently, neither Palestinians nor Israelis trust the other party. [P3] Therefore, under the current circumstances, there can be no solution.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] A solution could be brokered by an international government that both sides trust.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2016/04/05/a-realistic-solution-to-the-israeli-palestinian-conflict/#1ef9cdc67631
  2. http://www.rosalux-nyc.org/the-options-for-resolving-the-israeli-palestinian-conflict/

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This page was last edited on Monday, 27 Jan 2020 at 16:23 UTC