Mapping the world's opinions

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Do cell phones cause cancer?

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified the radiofrequency fields generated by cell phones as "possibly carcinogenic to humans." With billions of people around the world using cell phones on a regular basis, any link between cell phones and cancer would represent a major public health risk. What does the science say? Has enough research been done? And can existing studies be trusted?

Yes, cell phones increase the risk of cancer.

There is enough evidence to conclude cell phones are linked to cancer.

Cancer incidence correlates with cell phone use

The number of cancer cases went up dramatically in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, just as cell phones were becoming widespread. Explore

Phone companies push bad science

Research into the link between cell phones and cancer has been undermined by the influence of the telecommunications industry. Explore

Cell phones emit radiation, which increases the possibility of people developing tumors in the brain.

People nowadays use cell phones every day for communication, entertainment, study, and work, etc. But electromagnetic radiation emitted by cell phones can be absorbed by the human body. By a great amount of exposure to this radiation, it could potentially cause the development of tumors. Cell phones emitting radiation might become a health concern. Explore

No, cell phones don't cause cancer.

There is no good reason to believe cell phones are a serious danger.

Physics says no

The radiation emitted by cell phones is too low-energy to cause cancer. Explore

Epidemiology says no

There is no statistical association between cancer rates and cell phone use. Explore

The health effects of cell phones are still unclear.

Further study of this question is critical.

Health authorities recommend caution

The official position of major health authorities and medical organizations is to remain cautious about cell phone radiation. Explore

Existing studies are not conclusive

Both experimental and epidemiologic studies have shown conflicting results, and further research is needed to clarify the situation. Explore
This page was last edited on Thursday, 6 Feb 2020 at 04:45 UTC