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Should the U.S. break up into smaller distinct nations? Show more Show less
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The United States, the third largest country in the world, spans an entire continent and touches two oceans. A flight from coast to coast takes on average six hours, and a drive takes about 45 hours. It is an enormous place, encompassing dozens of ethnicities, states, ideologies, and dynamics. Such a large place brings with it disagreement, but whether those disagreements are large enough to result in the need for smaller nations is up for debate.

Yes, the US should break into smaller nations Show more Show less

The differences between the regions and states of the United States have become too stark. America is simply too large to achieve cohesion, and if any real progress is to be made in the country, it must change its thinking and become separate countries. This would afford the sharp regional differences to no longer hinder a federal government. Furthermore, there has long been a states’ rights mentality in the United States, to break down a step further is the logical progression. A situation like the European Union may be favorable.
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America’s time is up

No one likes an aging star, and admittedly America had a nice run. They wrote a pretty good Constitution, won two world wars, invented the internet, and were the first men on the moon. Now, in the midst of a mess, it might be time to cut America’s losses.

The Argument

America used to be the beacon of freedom for the world. Now the country are the ones with children in cages, paramilitary on the streets of our cities, and being monitored by Amnesty International.[1] We used to oversee other country’s elections. Now they want to monitor ours. We used to be the place people ran to for safety. Now we are the pariahs of the world, our passports unable to take us almost anywhere in the context of Covid-19. Canadian jokes aside, many have considered fleeing north, either in jest or in all seriousness.[2] Many argue that the issues plaguing the United States today, notably climate change, race relations, the economy, among many others, are better solved separately than together. Already, many argue that the Constitution is in need of a serious facelift.[3] By comparison – France is on their fifth! Instead of re-writing the Constitution as a whole, states could do as they pleased to right the issues in their own way. The United States has always been a country to prioritize states’ rights. It is time to face facts that America has expired, and merely needs to throw away the spoiled milk.[4]

Counter arguments

America issues are relative. When Americans lament over things like our “happiness,” specifically that we aren’t “happy enough” they forget that the comparison to countries like Finland is seriously pointless.[5] It is only fruitful to compare America the other “great” countries of the world, with “greatness” denoting size, population, economy, global influence, and other similar factors. Therefore, it is only just to make comparisons to China, Japan, Germany, India, and Russia.[6] China currently puts its Muslim population in vast concentration camps, Japan’s women are living in a beyond an antiquated patriarchy, a huge chunk of the population lives like the third world in India, and the pillars of truth and justice of Russia are not known for their solid standing.[7] Every country of this size has its faults. Perhaps Germany is “happier” while still being successful, but their population is a quarter of the size or less compared to the rest of these countries. America, united, has its faults, but the issues aren’t ones that are solved by breaking up.

Proponents

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.heritage.org/americas-biggest-issues
  2. https://fortune.com/2016/11/08/election-move-canada-trump/
  3. https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/09/05/new-constitution-change-amendment-law-219586
  4. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/11/maybe-its-time-for-america-to-split-up.html
  5. https://worldhappiness.report/ed/2020/#read
  6. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/22/us-is-falling-behind-its-peers-americans-if-not-their-leaders-are-starting-notice/
  7. https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/global-issues-overview/
This page was last edited on Friday, 13 Nov 2020 at 19:13 UTC

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