Mapping the world's opinions

argument top image

Is spending time quarantined bad for your mental health? Show more Show less

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has left people who have come into contact with the virus self-isolating to avoid infecting others. As the world's population goes into quarantine, does spending time quarantined lead to negative mental health outcomes?

It depends Show more Show less

The mental health outcomes from extended periods of quarantine and isolation are dependent on many factors.
< Previous (3 of 3 Positions)

On external stressors

It is not quarantine itself that is causing negative mental health outcomes, but the stressors that come with most quarantines.
< Previous (1 of 2 Arguments) Next >

Context

A person who self-quarantines but can continue to work and is not concerned for their future financial security has less reason to stress in quarantine.

The Argument

If people are going into quarantine with no income, and no guarantee that they will still have their job when the pandemic subsides, they are far more likely to experience negative mental health outcomes from quarantine.

Counter arguments

This only makes a small difference. The worst impacts of quarantine on our mental health are caused by reduced social interaction and physical contact with loved ones. Financial security is not enough to offset the mental stress of losing physical contact with friends and family.

Framing

Premises

[P1] It isn't quarantine that makes us stressed, it is the uncertainty that arises from a global pandemic. [P2] Therefore, those with increased certainty, will have more positive mental health outcomes than those with more uncertainty.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] The act of quarantining and cutting ourselves off from friends and family also makes us stressed.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

    Explore related arguments

    This page was last edited on Sunday, 22 Mar 2020 at 18:40 UTC