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How did Amelia Earhart die? Show more Show less
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Amelia Earhart's disappearance and presumed death in the midst of her attempt to circumnavigate the globe by plane has long been an international interest. Many believe her plane crashed in Pacific and that she and her companion perished, but others believe in more unusual theories.

Amelia Earhart made it to Gardner Island (Nikumaroro) and perished there or in surrounding waters. Show more Show less

The Gardner Island (Nikumaroro) hypothesis presumes that Earhart, an experienced aviator, would not have wasted time searching for Howland Island and would have turned southward instead.
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Amelia Earhart died when her plane crashed near Gardner Island (Nikumaroro)

Earhart did not die near Howland Island, but instead towards the South near Gardner Island

The Argument

Contrary to popular belief, Amelia Earhart did not die crashing near Howland, but crashing near Gardner Island, also known as Nikumaroro. This hypothesis stems from the idea that due to an inability to locate Howland, Earhart and Noonan decided to turn southward toward Gardner Island. Both Earhart and Noonan possessed significant flying experience, so it is unlikely that they would have wasted time and fuel searching for Howland. Instead, there efforts would be turned to finding an additional location to land, likely Gardner Island. Therefore, Earhart could have presumably ran out of fuel near this island and crashed, as opposed to near Howland. Also, this theory is based on Earhart’s last radio transmissions, with the idea that Earhart landed during the confirmed low tide on the island.[1] However, the tide would have eventually lifted Earhart’s plane, the Elektra, off the reef where it sank or broke up in the surf soon after landing. Either way, it is likely that Earhart and Noonan died on impact near Gardner Island, or very soon after landing.[2]

Counter arguments

The theory that Amelia Earhart died near Gardner Island, also known as Nikumaroro, is impractical. Firstly, the island and its surrounding waters have been searched many times, similar to other locations where the Elektra was believed to have crashed. In August 2019, ocean explorer Robert Ballard whose accomplishments include locating the RMS Titanic mounted the largest ever search of the area and found nothing. Allison Fundis, Ballard's Chief Operating Officer of the expedition stated, “We felt like if her plane was there, we would have found it pretty early in the expedition.”[3] If anyone were to find the wreckage or evidence, it would be this expedition using the most advanced technology of the time, yet they found nothing.

Proponents

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

  1. https://www.parlia.com/edit/a/amelia-earhart-survived-initial-crash-of-her-plane#explore
  2. https://www.history.com/topics/exploration/what-happened-to-amelia-earhart#:~:text=In%20its%20official%20report%20at,18%20months%20after%20she%20disappeared.
  3. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/14/science/amelia-earhart-robert-ballard.html
This page was last edited on Tuesday, 20 Oct 2020 at 16:30 UTC

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