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Why are some people always late? Show more Show less
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We all know someone who cannot for the life of them show up anywhere on time. We now have a lot of technology that helps us avoid this issue - so where is the problem? Is being late a symbol of disrespect for others' time? Is being late a symbol of optimism in the amount of time it takes to get somewhere? Or something else entirely?

Some people are always late because they have a low opinion of themselves Show more Show less

They expect to disappoint.
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Some people self-destructively make poor impressions.

A poor sense of self-worth leads some people to be late constantly because bad self-esteem can result in anxiety or depression, which make it difficult to manage time well.

Context

This argument is important because it could help us end the societal annoyance of tardiness.

The Argument

People are late because they have little self-worth. [1]. Often, people with self-esteem issues don't invest in how others perceive them. As a result, they cannot find the energy to be on-time for work or make new friends. Instead, they are habitually late. This self-destructive tendency can be conscious or unconscious. People may not have the confidence to show up somewhere, leading them to be late. They don’t value themselves, so they don’t think other people value their presence. This leads them to drag themselves places, often at a slow pace. A low-self worth leads people to act in self-destructive patterns. These self-destructive patterns might arise because of depression or for some other reason, but people practice them because they cling to them as manifestations of their low-self worth. [2]People who show up for work late every day may want their coworkers to continue to think little of them so that their perceptions will match the late person's low opinion of themselves. Another reason for this self-destructive lateness can be anxiety. People get trapped in a rut of thinking they’re not wanted somewhere, and so are constantly late if they even show up at all. This means that lateness can be caused by a manifestation of social anxiety. [3] In light of this, it is logical to think that some people's lateness indicates deeper problems of low self-esteem or poor mental health.

Counter arguments

Lateness is just a bad habit, and cannot be explained by psychological disorders. People who use their mental health as an excuse for lateness are doing just that – making an excuse. People who have social anxiety are more likely to be on-time so that they don’t draw more attention to themselves for being late. If people are late because of their depression, it’s more likely because their fatigue kept them from getting there on-time. Low self-worth manifests in many ways, but not in being chronically late. People with low-self worth are sensitive to criticism and too focused on their own inner pain to socialize and empathize with other people’s needs. This is what causes their lateness.[4] People with mental health issues are late for other reasons, not because of their low self-worth.

Proponents

Premises

{P1] Self-hatred causes people to act in self-destructive ways. [P2] Depression can cause self-hatred, thus leading to self-destructive behavior. [P3] Therefore, depression's manifestation of symptoms can cause lateness. [P4] Anxiety or social anxiety can also cause tardiness because anxiety causes people to be late.

Rejecting the premises

[P2] Depression causes low-self worth, not self-destructive behavior. [P3, P4] Challenges with your mental health do not cause lateness.

References

  1. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/enlightened-living/200812/tardiness-self-worth-and-being-present
  2. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/fighting-fear/201701/why-do-some-people-do-self-destructive-things
  3. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/beyond-self-destructive-behavior/201512/understanding-self-destructive-dysregulated-behaviors
  4. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/beyond-self-destructive-behavior/201512/understanding-self-destructive-dysregulated-behaviors
This page was last edited on Wednesday, 17 Jun 2020 at 19:06 UTC