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Anarchism describes a diverse range of political and philosophical beliefs, ranging from the individualism of anarcho-capitalism to the communitarianism of anarcho-syndicalism. However, they hold in common a belief in the primacy of freedom: the individual's ability to act according to their conscience, without coercion from or subjugation to an oppressive authority. Often, this authority is identified with the state, along with other hierarchical organisations, both secular and religious. Anarchism has long been derided and dismissed as fanciful and unworkable, even incoherent -- yet throughout history there have been serious attempts to build free societies, organised on the principles of horizontalism, participatory democracy, and mutual aid. Is a free future at all likely for humankind, or are Anarchists just 'demanding the impossible'?

Anarchism is currently possible. Show more Show less

Historical and contemporary attempts to create large-scale Anarchist societies have been largely successful.
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The entire world is already in an anarchic state because of protests

Countries in the world are falling apart. Protests against human rights violations reflect the governments inability to care for its people. People are ready to overthrow the government and take care of themselves.
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Proponents


Context

The world experiences catastrophes and problems all the time. In 1939, World War 2 took place. September 11, 2001, America suffered major casualties from a terrorist attack. Currently, there’s a worldwide protest about human rights and racial and gender equality. People point their frustrations at the government because the government is the highest form of power in the land.

The Argument

The world is already in anarchy. Civilians hate how their government is functioning. Therefore, they express their thoughts on social media. Economies are unfair; therefore, people complain to the government. There are protests in all areas of the world. There aren’t any true higher authorities. Just because there are presidents, governors, kings, and queens, they are aware of other countries around them. The world is increasingly becoming one giant society. Soon kings and presidents won’t matter anymore. All that really matters is the people of the countries. The world isn’t as isolated as it used to be, and people are growing tired of their unfair government systems. Some don’t even know how their governments work because they’re so disconnected from. Although no one’s setting fire to buildings or hacking secret files, it doesn’t mean the world isn’t in anarchy. Anarchy is subtle.

Counter arguments

Anarchy is a bit more complicated than protesting a government. Anarchy includes a communal mentality as well as believing that government is unnecessary. The communal mentality means that everyone would give up their property and share it amongst each other equally.[1] Only a few countries in the world do this. That proves that not all the world is in anarchy. Anarchy also has no hierarchy. The whole point of an anarchist community is for everyone to be equal. But that doesn’t exist in the world because there are still government powers. Even the Rojava community, a current anarchist community, has a government system, making them not a true anarchist community. The world is not in anarchy. Governments are still in place and capitalism exists. If there was an idea for the world to be in total anarchy, people would have to give up a lot of comforts. Worldwide anarchy will not be happening anytime soon.

Premises

[P1] The world is in anarchy because everyone hates their government. [P2] Higher powers such as kings, queens, and presidents don’t really matter.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] The world is not in anarchy because of disdain for the government. [Rejecting P2] Anarchy exists without world leaders; therefore, the world is not in anarchy.

References

  1. https://www.britannica.com/topic/anarchism/Anarchism-in-Spain

This page was last edited on Friday, 10 Jul 2020 at 16:13 UTC

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