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Is social media being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states? Show more Show less
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The 2016 US Presidential election saw the use of fake news to concentrate polarising content in swing states, and to intimidate certain groups of people into not showing up to vote. Under the extreme pressure of the 2020 Presidential elections, is social media being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states?

No, social media is not being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states Show more Show less

Social media is not being used to target the disenfranchised in swing states. The use of fake news in politics is overstated and voter suppression is a myth.
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Social media’s influence on voters is exaggerated

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The Argument

Voters are not easily influenced by social media. They are aware of the existence of disinformation on different platforms and are careful to consider this when reading pieces of fake news. There is a clear distinction between where people receive their news, and where they get their opinions. They may use social media platforms such as Twitter to learn more about the election and the candidates' policies. Their opinions are formulated by themselves, and are therefore unlikely to be influenced by social media.

Counter arguments

Social media can be very misleading and must have an impact on voter decisions. Reports of the irrelevance of social media on election outcomes are outdated and exaggerated as the use of it to assimilate disinformation and foster voter suppression is a real problem.

Premises

Rejecting the premises

References

This page was last edited on Saturday, 24 Oct 2020 at 17:10 UTC

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