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Should multicultural literature be included in the high school curriculum? Show more Show less
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Multicultural literature includes literature about people who are underrepresented in mainstream society and have been marginalized in some way, including Asian-American, African-American, and Chicano-American literature. For the most part, high school curriculum for English courses revolve around teaching the classics, but should more diverse literature be taught in high schools?

Yes, multicultural literature should be taught in schools Show more Show less

Students can gain affirmation about themselves and their culture.
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Students will see themselves reflected in literature

The literature will empower students, who identify with the culture, identity, and race of the characters within the literature, to read more.
Literature
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The Argument

Literature can be a source that provides students with an affirmation about themselves and their culture. The ability to relate to characters and situations in literature can be a major factor in book selection and overall desire to read. When students don’t find themselves reflected in literature, they are less likely to be engaged in reading. Students are often asked to make connections to what they are reading, so it is important that they find characters and situations that they can relate to in the literature they are reading.[1]

Counter arguments

Students might feel ashamed or embarrassed about certain aspects of their culture that could be illustrated in the literature. In turn, it will create cultural barriers between them and other students who don’t identify with the culture.

Premises

[P1] By introducing multicultural literature, students from these cultures will feel represented. [P2] Therefore, students will become more involved in what they're reading and do better in class.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] Introducing multicultural literature will make students feel alienated rather than represented.

References

  1. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ783082
This page was last edited on Monday, 26 Oct 2020 at 15:12 UTC

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